Search Buzz Video Recap: Google Search Ranking Changes, Top Ranking Signals & Dynamic Algorithms

First, I am offline, so this video and post was all created and produced on Wednesday, things may have transpired between now and then that I may have to catch up on this Monday. Google did some algorithm search ranking updates this week, it seem not too widespread but it was impactful. Google said the algorithm monitoring tools do often get it right. Google said there is no such thing as a top three ranking signals. Why? Well they explain it depends on the query and the context of the search. Google said they do not use click data for rankings, again. Google said shopping cart abandonment rate is not a fact. Google doesnât review each and every spam report. Google doesnât use disavow files for finding spam in their algorithms. Google said responsive sites are already ready for the mobile first index. Google said chatbots donât make your pages better quality. Google updated their AdWords terms and conditions. Google is testing indoor maps in the knowledge panel. Google AdSense is beta testing automated auto ads. Google AdSenseâs ad balance tool isnât working right. Have a happy and healthy Jewish New Years! That was this past week in search a the Search Engine Roundtable.

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For the original iTunes version, click here.

Search Topics of Discussion:

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This post was scheduled to go live today but was written earlier – I am currently offline today.


Source: SEroundTable

Google: Fetch & Render Preview Not Used In Search

If you thought Google uses the preview you see in the fetch and render for search purposes, you would be wrong. Google’s John Mueller said on Twitter that the fetch and render preview image is just for you to see what Google sees but it is not used for search.

Here is the tweet:

Google did say in the past that the fetch and render is way better than looking at the cached version in Google. But then again, here is John saying it isn’t used in search.

We are still awaiting an update where Google improves the fetch and render tool for more sites.

Forum discussion at Twitter.

This post was scheduled to go live today but was written earlier – I am currently offline today.


Source: SEroundTable

Google: Responsive Sites Don't Need To Worry About Mobile First Index

Gary Illyes from Google said at the BrightonSEO conference that those with responsive sites don’t really need to worry about the upcoming mobile first index. I was not at the event where he said that but Greg Gifford was there and he posted it on Twitter.

He said:

Google has been proactively encouraging webmasters to get their sites ready by migrating to responsive design. The mobile first index is expected to happen sooner than later and the best way to do that is to make sure your pages are equivalent and responsive sites help with that.

So if you want to feel somewhat safe, go responsive. Otherwise, check page by page to make sure your pages are equivalent.

Forum discussion at Twitter.

This post was scheduled to go live today but was written earlier – I am currently offline today.


Source: SEroundTable

Google Tests White Knowledge Panels

Google is now testing white knowledge panels for local results. This was first spotted by our man Sergey Alakov and he posted a screen shot on Twitter of the white look. Typically there is a blue interface for the knowledge panels but here, as you can see, Google is testing it in white.

Here is Sergey’s screen shot:

Here is what I see:

Google is always testing things like this, so just add this test to their testing bucket and heck, I only cover maybe 20% of the tests I see.

Forum discussion at Twitter.

This post was scheduled to go live today but was written earlier – I am currently offline today.


Source: SEroundTable

Googlebot Still On Hold On Supporting HTTP/2

John Mueller of Google said the other day in his hangout at the 1 hour and 13 minute mark that Googlebot still is not crawling in HTTP/2. The reason it is not is because Googlebot is pretty good at crawling quickly and it wouldn’t take advantage of the same benefits a browser would benefit from with HTTP/2 he said.

Here is what John said:

No, at the moment we donât crawl HTTP/2.

We are looking into what we can do with that. In general, the tricky part there is that for the most part Googlebot isnât the same as a browser so you wouldnât see the same speed effects as a browser would in regards to HTTP/2. So we can cache things a little bit differently, we can do requests in a more parallax way. A little bit different than an average browser would do. So we donât see the full advantages of Google going to HTTP/2.

But espesially as we see more web sites implementing the push functionality, HTTP/2 where you can request the HTML page and it includes all of the embedded content right away, then that might be something where Googlebot engineers say now it really make sense to actually implement HTTP/2 for Googlebot.

That does not mean you can’t make your site HTTP/2, Google said go ahead and do that. We were however expecting Googlebot to support it sooner but I guess it is back burnered now. HTTP/2 doesn’t give your site an SEO advantage nor a super big crawl advantage yet.

Here is the video embed:

Forum discussion at YouTube.

This post was scheduled to go live today but was written earlier – I am currently offline today.


Source: SEroundTable

Google To Find E-Books At Your Public Library

Google shared a new feature in search quietly on Twitter this week, the ability to search Google for e-books available at your local public library.

Just search for the book title and side that knowledge panel card over to where it says “Get Book” – it will then tell you if it is available to “borrow” by “libraries near you.”

Here is a screen shot I took the other day:

Forum discussion at Twitter.

This post was scheduled to go live today but was written earlier – I am currently offline today.


Source: SEroundTable

Daily Search Forum Recap: September 21, 2017

Here is a recap of what happened in the search forums today, through the eyes of the Search Engine Roundtable and other search forums on the web.

Search Engine Roundtable Stories:

Other Great Search Forum Threads:

This post was scheduled to go live today but was written earlier – I am currently offline today.


Source: SEroundTable

3 AdWords extensions now eligible for call-only ads


Over the past few years, extensions have played a major role in the optimization of text ads. Ad extensions help to provide more context than the ad titles and descriptions — typically giving advertisers a boost when it comes to click-through rate. Previously, call-only ads did not display these ad extensions, but starting today, call-only ads will be eligible for three extension types. Not surprisingly, the included extensions aren’t those that require clicks — as the goal of the call-only ads is to increase phone calls.

The three ad extensions available for call-only ads are:

Location extensions
Using location extension can let searchers know where they are calling. This should be a big boon for brands with multiple locations, as it should help to persuade folks to click, knowing that they won’t be going to a national line.

Callout extensions
Callout extensions offer flexibility in providing more detail in an ad, and they are likely to be the most utilized extension with call-only ads.

Structured snippets
Just as with text ads, structured snippets give simple context to goods and services.

If any of these extension types are already set at the account level, they will be eligble automatically to display with call-only ads. Customized extensions can also be set at the campaign level for this ad type.

So far, Google has reported a click-through rate improvement of 10 percent “on average” when companies have tested these extensions with call-only ads.

The post 3 AdWords extensions now eligible for call-only ads appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Source: SEland

Bing Ads will automatically clean up legacy Content Network ad groups after Nov. 30

Back in May, Bing Ads announced that it was closing up its Content Network due to low-quality traffic. On July 31, Bing stopped running Content Network ads and took away the ability to create new content ads. This has, however, left many accounts with legacy “content” ads that were made before July 31. These ads aren’t showing on the Content Network, and Bing Ads will now be cleaning these up on your behalf.

After November 30, Bing Ads will begin to label these ad groups properly. Currently, some ad groups can be labeled as “search and content network” (the former default setting) or “content network,” though they would now be the search network or they wouldn’t be running at all. After November 30, Bing will be proactively cleaning up user accounts by performing the following tasks on all accounts:

  • Turning all ad groups that are currently set to “search and content network” to “search network” only.
  • Deleting any ad group that is exclusively set to “content network.” Note: These ad groups haven’t been serving ads since June 30, and this will not impact your results in comparison to the last two months.
  • Ending users’ ability to create content bids within ad groups.
  • Deleting any keyword with the match type of content.

Advertisers will have the ability to repurpose these ad groups if the ad distribution is changed to “search network” before deletion on November 30.

Most advertisers should welcome this change, as Bing is simply doing some fall cleaning on your behalf.

The post Bing Ads will automatically clean up legacy Content Network ad groups after Nov. 30 appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Source: SEland